The stories behind fives Canoes that define Canada...

Victor Adams Haida Dugout

In the wake of devastating disease epidemics and external threats to many of their traditions, the making of large, sea-going canoes on Canada’s west coast had been predominantly interrupted for much of the 20th century. In 1969 the founder of The Canadian Canoe Museum, Kirk Wipper, commissioned a dugout canoe from Haida carver Victor Adams. Read more...

Enys’ Estate 18th Century Birch Bark Canoe

This birch bark canoe, which dates back to a time of war and revolution in late eighteenth century, is one of the oldest documented birch bark canoes in the world and an invaluable piece of Canadian history. Read more...

Don Starkell’s Canoe ORELLANA

“My trip was something about imagination – to be able to imagine something and to really think about it and make it happen.” These are the words of Don Starkell who with his son Dana, completed the longest single journey undertaken in one canoe. Read more...

Modified James Bay Freighter Canoe CHEECHOO

At a glance, Cheechoo might be mistaken for an inshore fishing or lobster boat and certainly stretches the boundaries of The Canadian Canoe Museum’s collection! Read more...

Mark Oldershaw’s Olympic C1 Sprint Canoe

Mark is the fifth member of the Oldershaw family over three generations to participate at the Olympics in Canoe Sprint events. Read more...